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January 20 PVSSC Meeting

Members attending the meeting in McLean, VA enjoyed “War Dogs of the Pacific,” a very moving tribute to the sacrifices of men and dogs during WW II. The film, narrated by the veterans themselves, described the training of dogs and their Marine handlers, all of whom were novices to start. Initially unappreciated, the dogs soon showed their worth in keeping our soldiers safe in dangerous jungle warfare. The debt owed these dogs was immense, and their handlers knew it – “I still miss him…” after 50 years, said one man. A box of tissues was positioned for quick use…


February 24 PVSSC Meeting

A good turnout of members for the February 24 PVSSC meeting at the home of Nicole and Elaine Miller. Everyone enjoyed Michelle Bell’s account of her visit with her mother Sabine Baker and Pat White to the 2017 FCI World Dog Show in Leipzig, Germany. The show was the LARGEST DOG SHOW EVER! There were 31,000 entries with over 300 breeds represented, many unknown in the United States. Michelle also gave us a good impression of what it was like, the crowds, the shopping, the different look of European SS, which are shown there with natural ears and tails. They also had some adventures with the perhaps a bit too punctual train system in Germany! The meeting was also enlivened by Michelle’s new puppy, Diana, who enthusiastically enjoyed the club meet and greet!


March 24 PVSSC Meeting

The March PVSSC meeting was a fascinating exploration of the ancient practice of Acupuncture. After the social and a brief business meeting, PVSSC member Dr. Francie Dougherty gave us a short history of acupuncture, theories as to its mode of action, and descriptions of use for a variety of issues including pain, mobility, immune system, organ function and mental state. It has been shown to be effective in animals as well as humans, and is increasingly used as an adjunct or alternative to Western medicine.

Candace Craig’s miniature schnauzer, Jazz, was our “demo dog.” (Jazz is 14 and has some mobility and health issues.)  Dr. Dougherty explained the reason for placement of the tiny needles at various sites – acupuncture points – and what responses could be expected from each. The needles are spun, which is thought to produce a mini-trauma at the site, triggering the release of endorphins and other neuro-hormones to the area. These relax the tissue and affect the pain pathways in the peripheral and central nervous systems. Jazz certainly seemed a lot more lively after her brief treatment!

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